Organizations that will help pay for veterinary bills

Let’s face it, veterinary medicine can be expensive! When an emergency arises and you can’t afford the vet bills for your pet, what can you do?

Unfortunately most vets won’t take payment plans. The reason for this is that too many “bad apples” have spoiled it for all of the honest people. However, there are some organizations that may be able to help.

First, if you want to set up a payment plan, check out the following companies which most vets will work with:

There are also several organizations that can help you to pay for emergency vet bills:

  • Angels 4 Animals: http://www.Angels4Animals.org– a non-profit organization and a program of Inner Voice Community Services, has a mission to serve as the guardian angel of animals whose caretakers find themselves in difficult financial situations.
  • Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP): http://www.fveap.org/sys-tmpl/door/– The NEED & The HELP: Seniors, People with disabilities, People who have lost their job, Good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten – any of these folks may need financial assistance to save a beloved companion.
  • Help-A-Pet: http://www.help-a-pet.org/home.html – Our efforts focus on serving the elderly, the disabled, and the working poor. For lonely seniors, physically/mentally challenged individuals and children of working parents, pets represent much more than a diversion.
  • IMOM: http://www.imom.org – Mission Statement: “Helping people help pets. To better the lives of sick, injured and abused companion animals. We are dedicated to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker is financially challenged.”
  • The Pet Fund: http://thepetfund.com – The Pet Fund is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit association that provides financial assistance to owners of domestic animals who need urgent veterinary care.
  • United Animal Nations: http://www.uan.org/lifeline/index.html: The mission of LifeLine is to help homeless or recently rescued animals suffering from life-threatening conditions that require specific and immediate emergency veterinary care.
  • R.U.F.F (Rescuing Unwanted Furry Friends): http://www.ruffrescue.org/ – RUFF’s mission is to help pay the veterinary bills for sick, injured and abandoned animals, while also supporting humane education. Serving abandoned, ill and injured animals in Orange County, CA.

The following groups help with specific breeds or injuries:

  • OSLF Fund for Orthopedic Cases: http://www.oslf.org/orthofund.htm – The goal of Orthodogs’ Silver Lining Foundation (OSLF) Fund is to assist with the treatment, support or surgery of any orthopedic condition or injury in which it has been determined that the desired course of action will significantly improve the dog’s quality of life. In addition to surgical treatment, OSLF will assist with support devices, prosthetics, mobility aids, supplements and alternative treatments when it has been determined by a veterinarian (either conventional, holistic or homeopathic) that such options will significantly improve the dog’s quality of life. The dog must be a companion animal that has a permanent home.
If you live in Ontario, Canada and have a disability:

If your animal is in pain or suffering and you are unable to pay for veterinary care in many cases your local humane society will help. They will often offer veterinary services or euthanasia at low or no cost. To find your local humane society try going to Google and entering in “Humane Society YourCity”.

If you need help determining whether your pet needs to see a vet, or would like to speak to a veterinarian, please go to www.askavetquestion.com.

Dr. MarieDr. Marie is a veterinarian who practices in a busy animal hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. She created Ask A Vet Question as a resource for good, accurate veterinary advice online. Dr. Marie treats dogs, cats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and rats. She has been a vet since 1999.

Is an online vet visit just as good as a trip to your veterinarian? No! But, many times, asking an online veterinarian a question can help save you money. While Dr. Marie can't officially diagnose your pet or prescribe medications, she can often advise you on whether a vet visit is necessary. You can also ask Dr. Marie for a second opinion on your pet's condition.