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Does high pitch affect seizures?

Species: Dog
Breed: chihuahua
Age: 2-5 years
Hello there,

I've been living with my roommate for a year and her dog barks at me constantly. Whether it's just to go downstairs or entering our home. We've tried a few methods to discourage him, like spray bottles but they've become less affective. We were thinking about trying a product called Bark Off. Which supposedly discourages barking by emitting a high frequency sound which disrupts their barking. Are concern is that Rocko has had seizures in the past, maybe 3-4 a year, and we wondered if sound could be a trigger for seizures. So we were just wondering if there's any reason the sound would cause seizures.

Thank you
- Laura


Online vet, Dr. Marie

Dr. Marie replied:

Hi Laura and thanks for your question.

As far as I know, a high pitched sound is not known to trigger seizures. However, there are some dogs that can have their seizures triggered by stress, so if it is really stressful to have this sound go off then it is in theory possible that a seizure could be triggered. (But I doubt it).

Some other things you may want to look into for barking are citronella collars which emit a spray that dogs don't like.

I am not a fan of shock collars for barking as there is a lot of potential for things to go wrong.

I know there is an ad that often pops up on my site for anti-barking, but I haven't been able to check it out just yet.

I hope this answers your question.

Dr. Marie.

---This question was asked in our Ask A Vet For Free section.---


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Disclaimer: Although Dr. Marie is a qualified veterinarian, the information found on this site is not meant to replace the advice of your own veterinarian. AskAVetQuestion.com and Dr. Marie do not accept any responsibility for any loss, damage, injury, death, or disease which may arise from reliance on information contained on this site. Do not use information found on this site for diagnosing or treating your pet. Anything you read here is for information only.

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Dr. MarieDr. Marie is a veterinarian who practices in a busy animal hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. She created Ask A Vet Question as a resource for good, accurate veterinary advice online. Dr. Marie treats dogs, cats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and rats. She has been a vet since 1999.

Is an online vet visit just as good as a trip to your veterinarian? No! But, many times, asking an online veterinarian a question can help save you money. While Dr. Marie can't officially diagnose your pet or prescribe medications, she can often advise you on whether a vet visit is necessary. You can also ask Dr. Marie for a second opinion on your pet's condition.