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Limping cat.

Species: Cat
Breed: long hair (used to b
Age: 5-8 years
My cat is limping, she is not putting weight on her left hind leg. She isn't cut or bleeding. I didn't see anything stuck in her footpad, and she didn't seem to mind me feeling her leg. What could be wrong? Should I take her to a vet?


Online vet, Dr. Marie

Dr. Marie replied:

Sorry to her that Tittertat is not well. (Cute name by the way.)

The most common reason for a cat to be limping is if she has suffered a bite wound from another cat. Often the original wound will heal but there can be infection in the skin underneath. If this is the case then the only effective treatment is medication prescribed by your veterinarian.

It is also possible that she has suffered some trauma to that leg. It could be anything from a fractured toe to a dislocated hip.

When a cat is limping I have a few criteria that tells me whether it is time to see the vet or not:

  • If she is very uncomfortable (i.e. crying in pain, not moving at all).
  • If the problem has not gotten better after 48 hours.

  • If her appetite is affected.

  • If there is a green or yellow discharge from anywhere.

  • If your gut is just telling you that you need to get her seen.



I hope she does ok!

Dr. Marie.

---This question was asked in our Ask A Vet For Free section.---


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Disclaimer: Although Dr. Marie is a qualified veterinarian, the information found on this site is not meant to replace the advice of your own veterinarian. AskAVetQuestion.com and Dr. Marie do not accept any responsibility for any loss, damage, injury, death, or disease which may arise from reliance on information contained on this site. Do not use information found on this site for diagnosing or treating your pet. Anything you read here is for information only.

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Dr. MarieDr. Marie is a veterinarian who practices in a busy animal hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. She created Ask A Vet Question as a resource for good, accurate veterinary advice online. Dr. Marie treats dogs, cats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and rats. She has been a vet since 1999.

Is an online vet visit just as good as a trip to your veterinarian? No! But, many times, asking an online veterinarian a question can help save you money. While Dr. Marie can't officially diagnose your pet or prescribe medications, she can often advise you on whether a vet visit is necessary. You can also ask Dr. Marie for a second opinion on your pet's condition.