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Repair hernia now?

Species: Dog
Breed: Pitbull
Age: Less than 3 mon
My pitbull puppy has an umbilical hernia, about the size of a half dollar. She shows no pain from it and it's soft to touch. Should I get it fixed right away or should I wait until I get her spayed?




Online vet, Dr. Marie

Dr. Marie replied:

It's pretty rare that I recommend repairing an umbilical hernia earlier than when a dog is spayed. The only ones that I have done early are ones where the hernia is HUGE (like big enough to put your fist into).

In theory, it is possible for intestines to pop out into the hernia. These intestines can be susceptible to injury if the dog was to say scrape herself on her belly. But, it would have to be a very significant injury in a very exact location in order for this to happen.

Your vet is the best person to ask about whether or not Kahlua's hernia is serious enough to require reapir now, but from what you have described it is probably perfectly safe to wait until she is spayed. The exception would be if it is getting much larger, or if it is ever red and painful for her. If that happens she needs to be seen right away.

For most animals I recommend a spay at 5-6 months of age. If an animal has a hernia that is getting larger I will sometimes do the spay at 4 months so that we can get the hernia fixed sooner.

Dr. Marie.




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Disclaimer: Although Dr. Marie is a qualified veterinarian, the information found on this site is not meant to replace the advice of your own veterinarian. AskAVetQuestion.com and Dr. Marie do not accept any responsibility for any loss, damage, injury, death, or disease which may arise from reliance on information contained on this site. Do not use information found on this site for diagnosing or treating your pet. Anything you read here is for information only.

Customer reply:

That was very helpful! Thank you!


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Dr. MarieDr. Marie is a veterinarian who practices in a busy animal hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. She created Ask A Vet Question as a resource for good, accurate veterinary advice online. Dr. Marie treats dogs, cats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and rats. She has been a vet since 1999.

Is an online vet visit just as good as a trip to your veterinarian? No! But, many times, asking an online veterinarian a question can help save you money. While Dr. Marie can't officially diagnose your pet or prescribe medications, she can often advise you on whether a vet visit is necessary. You can also ask Dr. Marie for a second opinion on your pet's condition.